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What card should the Queen of Hearts be in a deck of cards?

All ways here you see, are the Three of Clubs’ way!

All ways here you see, are the Three of Clubs’ way! This comes via Reddit’s r/crappydesign, the Comic Sans-loving subreddit devoted to horrifying style and engineering choices. User PingPongPresident found that “in the Disney Villains deck of playing cards, the Queen of Hearts is the three of Clubs.” Just, why?

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Alice Through the Looking Glass: Autopsy of an Expensive Alice Flop

In 1978, Michael Cimino took home the Best Picture and Best Director Academy Awards for his epic, The Deer Hunter, and was thus given a free pass to make whatever he wanted next. Heaven’s Gate, an even grander Western epic, went spectacularly over budget, costing $44 million dollars. The critical backlash to Cimino’s hubris led to… [read full post]

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No cuentes lo que viste en los jardines…

Ricardo Selma, an Argentinian artist of great technical skill, has many beautiful works (most featuring a beautiful woman in some state of repose) with nods to Klimpt, Mucha, The Wizard of Oz, and Alice in Wonderland. Some of the latter, including the pieces “El corazón de Alicia” and “No cuentes lo que viste en los… [read full post]

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Aceil in addelnnorW: A Bkoo

For many good reasons, Lewis Carroll’s classic is often chosen as a first text to translate into a new language or medium. Constructors of constructed languages and lovers of word-play have innate reasons to flock to Carroll’s text. Here’s a new “translation” of Alice in Wonderland into a language which is either pointlessly annoying, or an… [read full post]

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Marionettes for ‘La Guida di Bragia’ featured in Art Doll Quarterly

Lewis Carroll came from a large family, and got his start in children’s entertainment and storytelling by writing for and staging plays with his siblings. One surviving example is the puppet play La Guida di Bragia, dating from the early 1850’s. The LCSNA published the text in 2007 with illustrations by Jonathan Dixon – available here… [read full post]

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“And Black Alice had heard Boojums weren’t supposed to be all that smart…”

The Lavinia Whateley was a Boojum, a deep-space swimmer, but her kind had evolved in the high tempestuous envelopes of gas giants, and their offspring still spent their infancies there, in cloud-nurseries over eternal storms. And so she was streamlined, something like a vast spiny lionfish to the earth-adapted eye. Her sides were lined with gasbags filled… [read full post]

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Summer TV round-up PART TWO – Antiques Roadshow, Alice in Zombieland, and the future of Alice-derived Television

In yesterday’s Summer TV round-up PART ONE, the evil ghost of Alice Liddell came back through the looking-glass in Syfy’s Warehouse 13. The characters in the show needed to use enchanted artifacts, such as the caterpillar’s hookah, to conquer the demon. Alice-related artifacts were also on a very different show this May, namely, Antiques Roadshow…. [read full post]

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Summer TV round-up PART ONE – A Snark-obsessed professor and the murderous ghost of Alice Liddell

Lewis Carroll made a few cameos on television this summer. BBC’s Inspector Lewis, on Masterpiece Mystery (also on PBS in America), had an episode in Season V called “The Soul of Genius.” The dead body in this whodunit was a professor obsessed with The Hunting of the Snark, and of course the Inspector has to… [read full post]

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Tweedle-Dum and Tweedle-Dee are skinhead 1960’s soccer fans

This May, a London jeweller-turned-artist named Joe O’Donovan displayed his new series of “Alice in Wonderland” paintings at the Marleybone Library in Westminster. The West End Extra reported that “among the works is a picture of Tweedle Dum and Tweedle Dee, who the 57-year-old acrylics painter has reimagined as a pair of hardnut football fans… [read full post]

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