Gorgeous Images from a Stunning Looking Glass Production in Moscow

Petr Fomenko Looking GlassMy thanks to artist and LCSNA member (and mimsy minion) Tania Ianovskaia for this description of a stunning recent production of Alice Through the Looking Glass in Moscow.  We appreciate this information, Tania!  Now, if only there could be a film of that production, or a tour of it in other countries.  The imagery is simply wonderful.

“The premiere of the performance “Alisa v Zazerkalie” (Alice Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll ) held in  the Studio – Theater of Petr Fomenko took place in 2010. It became one of the best and most beloved performances of the theater. The Director of the show was of Macedonian heritage. Ivan Popovsky created an unforgettable dynamic, resulting in a merry and at the same time magic performance which lasted more than three hours. But nobody noticed how time flew as they watched – children and adults alike were delighted. The remarkable costumes were created by Serbian designer Angelina Atlagich and fairy tale set design was created by the group of talented visual artists called Artists  Union, with the  director  among them .  The lighting of the set , modern  use of projections and  dynamic music  created the unforgettable atmosphere of the performance based on Carroll’s Looking Glass.
Some info about Petr Fomenko – Ever since the founding of his theatre in 1988, Petr Fomenko  has been known for his experimental productions, which used to take place in a run-down old cinema house.
In 2008, Fomenko moved his troupe into fancy new digs overlooking the Moscow River – a marble and glass beauty built by architect Sergei Gnedovsky. Petr Fomenko passed away 9 August 2012 at the age of 80 .”
The selection of photos provided will give you an impression of what was going on stage:

Contrariwise CD Release Party This Friday January 10th

Contrariwise Album CoverIn a recent post I noted the release of a new CD by alternative band Daniel Hales, and the frost heaves, called Contrariwise: Music From Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass.  Daniel wants to let everyone know that this Friday, January 10th at 6:30pm in Massachusetts, they will be holding their official CD launch party.

You can read more about the event, including details and ticket pricing, on this Facebook page.

And you can watch a live performance compilation clip they made for “The Walrus and the Carpenter” right here (if the video doesn’t appear, try reloading this page in your browser):

 

German Translations of Carroll’s Works Available Print-on-Demand

Tenniel Looking-Glass TrainHere is another publishing item from one of our mimsy minions:

“Günther Flemming’s German translation of the Alice books (including Under Ground and the Nursery), the Snark, plus a plethora of prefaces, poems, riddles, biographical sketches, and the article “Alice on the Stage,” along with a “kaleidoscope” of annotations and commentary — a task begun in 1967 — has been published in three hardcover volumes. The total cost is €209 ($284) plus postage.
To buy, go to the print-on-demand site http://www.epubli.de and put “Günther Flemming” in the Search (Suchen) box, or buy it from Amazon.de:

Lewis Carroll As Victorian Art Director

Carroll Raven Writing DeskOne of our mimsy minions has shared a link to an interesting blog post that discusses the concept of Lewis Carroll as an Art Director–after all, he certainly oversaw all aspects of the publishing of the two Alice books.  The post also provides links to three related Pinterest boards.

To read all about it, click me.

Through the Looking-Glass and What Amanda Plummer Found There

One of our mimsy minions has alerted us to this NY Times review of the new film Abigail Harm, starring Amanda Plummer and directed by filmmaker Lee Isaac Chung.  The tie-ins with Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There are both literal and metaphorical, playing with the Alice and Fawn sequence.  The film also explores a myth that appears in more than one culture: a wild creature that can be captured by hiding its “robe” or skin (the film The Secret of Roan Inish offers an Irish version.)  To read the review of Abigail Harm, click me.

And here’s a trailer:

Sherlock Through the Looking-Glass

What if a series of puzzling crimes was being committed in Victorian London, and the only man to solve the mystery was Sherlock Holmes?  What, then, if he had to travel through the looking-glass, where logic doesn’t exist, to do it?  That’s the intriguing premise of the new play Sherlock Through the Looking-Glass by the ambitious California theatre troupe known as the Porters of Hellsgate.  The show opens on August 16, 2013 for a six week run.  And admit it: the poster art is pretty cool.  To read more, click me.

Carrollian Connections in the Waterspell Trilogy

As you may have noted by reading some of our prior blog posts, a number of our LCSNA members are authors.  Member Deborah J. Lightfoot writes to tell us that her Waterspell fantasy trilogy has distinct Carollian elements–including clever use of a copy of Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There within the storyline.

If you’re a fan of fantasy fiction, you might want to check out this series, which is now also available in eBook format.  Her site also include a blog detailing how she want about writing and then publishing the series.  To learn more, click me.

New List of Most Collectible Children’s Books

If you’re an avid collector of vintage children’s literature editions, you might be interested in this updated list of the most collectible children’s books, according to Helen Younger of Aleph-Bet Books.  As one would expect, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland makes the list.  And note the clever way she handles the issue of the publication date.  Disappointingly, Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There doesn’t make Younger’s list.  And don’t even think about The Hunting of the Snark.  So, whether we agree or disagree, it’s interesting to see one bookseller’s list based on 30 years in the rare book business.  To read the list, click here.  Thanks to one of our mimsy minions for this link.

Keep those blog submissions coming, minions!

Alice and Believing in Medieval Unicorns

An Alice sighting in Unicorn-land from LCSNA member Stephanie Lovett:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Cloisters Museum, home of the famous unicorn tapestries, has an exhibit running called Search for the Unicorn, which opens with the “If you believe in me, I’ll believe in you” quote from Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There.  The NY Times review cites it and links to the full text, and also provides a slideshow of the exhibit.

New Alice-Themed Music Project

We’ve just received the following note about a new indie music effort and Indiegogo campaign:

I’m writing because my band is recording an album of poem-song adaptations from “Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland” and “Through the Looking-Glass.” We’valready recorded half the tracks, and we launched an Indiegogo album pre-sale campaign on May 4th to raise the funds needecover the costs of additional recording, mixing, mastering, and duplication. Our album, “Contrariwise,” will be released on November 4th. I hope you’ll consider posting a link to our Indiegogo page, where we have a letter describing the project in more detail, as well as a 4 minute video that includes snippets fromrough demos of our versions of “Jabberwocky,” “Beautiful Soup,” “Queen Alice,” and others:http://igg.me/at/Contrariwise

If you’re into Alice-themed music, you might want to check it out!