German Translations of Carroll’s Works Available Print-on-Demand

Tenniel Looking-Glass TrainHere is another publishing item from one of our mimsy minions:

“Günther Flemming’s German translation of the Alice books (including Under Ground and the Nursery), the Snark, plus a plethora of prefaces, poems, riddles, biographical sketches, and the article “Alice on the Stage,” along with a “kaleidoscope” of annotations and commentary — a task begun in 1967 — has been published in three hardcover volumes. The total cost is €209 ($284) plus postage.
To buy, go to the print-on-demand site http://www.epubli.de and put “Günther Flemming” in the Search (Suchen) box, or buy it from Amazon.de:

A New Snark in London This December

For those of you who can’t get enough of stage adaptations of our beloved The Hunting of the Snark, one of our mimsy minions has alerted me to another upcoming production in London, playing this December.  I will note that the description of the piece includes this frumious statement:

An imaginative musical adventure that will inspire, excite and entertain, with the story of a lonely Boy and his father at its heart.

Ahem.  Clearly some artistic liberties have been taken once again.  But I do hope some of you BritMinions check it out.  And if you do, please report back for the benefit of your fellow blog readers!

To learn more, click the image or click me.

New List of Most Collectible Children’s Books

If you’re an avid collector of vintage children’s literature editions, you might be interested in this updated list of the most collectible children’s books, according to Helen Younger of Aleph-Bet Books.  As one would expect, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland makes the list.  And note the clever way she handles the issue of the publication date.  Disappointingly, Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There doesn’t make Younger’s list.  And don’t even think about The Hunting of the Snark.  So, whether we agree or disagree, it’s interesting to see one bookseller’s list based on 30 years in the rare book business.  To read the list, click here.  Thanks to one of our mimsy minions for this link.

Keep those blog submissions coming, minions!

Sighting of a New Dutch Hunting of the Snark Edition

Ahoy, Snark lovers!  Our own Mahendra Singh, who published a stunning edition himself a few years ago, has alerted us to the publication of a new Dutch version of Lewis Carroll’s immortal The Hunting of the Snark.  If you can read Dutch, you can find out more by clicking here.

If, like me, you can’t understand much beyond:

‘Precies de plek voor een Snark!’ riep de Man met de Bel'

you’ll still probably enjoy a peek at the sample illustration on that page!

UPDATE: If you’d like to buy a copy, but can’t read the Dutch instructions, here they are in English:

Send an email (in English) to Dick Ronner at mail@zolderman.nl; he’ll send you back a PayPal invoice for 18.25 euros (about $24.50) including postage.

Iris Theatre Presents a Month of Wonderland and a Night of Snark

News from London-town!  The Iris Theatre will be presenting two Carrollian productions in coming months, performed at St. Paul’s Church in Covent Garden.  Click the links below for more information about these performances:

Alice in Wonderland 
July 30-August 31st

And for one night only:
The Hunting of the Snark
September 1st

If you attend either of these, please do send us a paragraph telling us about the production.  Thanks!

 

A Nice Review for the Strawdog Snark in Chicago

The recent Strawdog Theatre Company production of The Hunting of the Snark  has softly and suddenly vanished away, but Josh Sobel, the production’s director and the company’s literary manager, just sent me this link to their rave review.  Who knows, maybe this Snark will surface again, in Chicago, NY, or at a theatre near you!

A New Theatrical Snark Sighting in Chicago

Apologies that we haven’t made a new post in a while. We have been off hunting Snarks–unsuccessfully, which may be just as well. Today, as Fate would have it, we received this very civilized note:

Dear Lewis Carroll Society 

My name is Josh Sobel and I am Literary Manager for Chicago’s Strawdog Theatre Company. I hope this email finds you well!  I noticed that you had posted information about the last time a Chicago theatre company had adapted Carroll for the stage, with the opera BOOJUM! 
 
As it turns out, the Snark has found its way to Chicago once again – I am directing an environmental, ensemble-based adaptation of the poem THE HUNTING OF THE SNARK with Strawdog, taking place in our Hugen Hall space (essentially our pub) and utilizing the actual text of the poem itself in inventive and unexpected ways. 
 
We have gathered 12 brilliant Chicago actors and have been working to bring the story to life in a minimalist, highly imaginative style, an almost pub-theatre approach engaging directly with the audience to open up their imaginations to the magic of this journey. 
 
Thank you very much for your time!  All the best, Josh Sobel

Their enclosed press release includes the following details:

Performances: May 6 – May 28 at Strawdog Theatre Hugen Hall, 3829 North Broadway Street. The performance schedule is Sundays, Mondays and Tuesdays at 8 p.m.; May 20 and 21 performances are at 9 p.m. Opening/Press Night is Monday, May 6 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15. Tickets may be ordered online at strawdog.org or by calling OvationTix toll-free: 866-811-4111.

Based on the classic Lewis Carroll poem, The Hunting Of The Snark,  is a family friendly show inviting its guests to come aboard for a tall tale of mischief and mayhem, of high sea hijinks and impossible voyages, of an improbable crew and an extraordinary task, of an inconceivable creature in a peculiar land, and of the unquenchable thirst for adventure.  A design and ensemble-based piece mixing theatrical influences from Chicago and around theworld; Strawdog stretches, flexes, trips over a ladder and treats the audience to a hilarious and touching take on one of the world’s best loved poems.

If you attend this production, please email us a 1-2 paragraph write-up that we can share on this blog!

And here’s a video teaser they’ve just released:

“And Black Alice had heard Boojums weren’t supposed to be all that smart…”

Mahendra Singh’s illustration of “The Baker’s Tale,” from his graphic novelization of The Hunting of the Snark. “‘But if ever I meet with a Boojum, that day, / In a moment (of this I am sure), / I shall softly and suddenly vanish away — / And the notion I cannot endure!'”

The Lavinia Whateley was a Boojum, a deep-space swimmer, but her kind had evolved in the high tempestuous envelopes of gas giants, and their offspring still spent their infancies there, in cloud-nurseries over eternal storms. And so she was streamlined, something like a vast spiny lionfish to the earth-adapted eye. Her sides were lined with gasbags filled with hydrogen; her vanes and wings furled tight. Her color was a blue-green so dark it seemed a glossy black unless the light struck it; her hide was impregnated with symbiotic algae.

Illustration from Lightspeed Magazine for the story “Boojum”

That’s the definition of a Boojum from the short story “Boojum,” by Sarah Monette & Elizabeth Bear, printed in the September 2012 issue of Lightspeed, a magazine of Sci-Fi and Fantasy fiction. There’s also a character named Black Alice. The story is online here, and ebooks of Lightspeed can be bought here or on Amazon here ($3.99).

Erin Stocks has an interview with the authors, and the first question is about the Carrollian title:

September 2012 issue of Lightsaber

Your short story “Boojum” happens to be one of my favorite science fiction stories written in the last few years, and I’m delighted we’re reprinting it in this issue. Some of our readers might recognize a “Boojum” as a dangerous kind of snark, a fictional animal species invented by Lewis Carroll, or maybe the intercontinental supersonic cruise missile dreamed up in the 1940s (and never completed) for the U.S. Air Force. Was the creation of the Lavinia Whateley influenced by either one of those?

We got the word from Lewis Carroll. The second story set in this universe, “Mongoose,” features monsters called toves, raths, and bandersnatches.

(Sarah: I don’t remember how we thought of crossing Lewis Carroll and H. P. Lovecraft, but since “The Hunting of the Snark” is one of my favorite poems, in retrospect it seems utterly inevitable. Bear: True story: Sarah and I once drove around Madison after a rainstorm looking at an enormous triple rainbow and reciting “The Jabberwock” to one another from memory. The intersection of Lovecraft, Carroll, whimsy, and horror seems inevitable once you’ve hit upon it.)

[continue reading this interview...]

Their story “Moongoose,” mentioned above (the one with toves, raths, and bandersnatches), was published in The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Twenty-Seventh Annual Collection (2010). “Within moments, the tove colony was in full warble, the harmonics making Irizarry’s head ache…”

Summer TV round-up PART ONE – A Snark-obsessed professor and the murderous ghost of Alice Liddell

Lewis Carroll made a few cameos on television this summer.

BBC’s Inspector Lewis, on Masterpiece Mystery (also on PBS in America), had an episode in Season V called “The Soul of Genius.” The dead body in this whodunit was a professor obsessed with The Hunting of the Snark, and of course the Inspector has to delve into the poem to search for clues, i.e. a “legendary riddle hidden in Carroll’s philosophical story of an impossible quest for the unknowable.” Oxford’s Botanical Gardens are also visited. Here’s the trailer from the PBS website:

Watch Inspector Lewis: The Soul of Genius Preview on PBS. See more from Masterpiece.

 I’m not sure when PBS reruns it, but it is already available on DVD at Amazon.comwhere it received mostly five-star costumer reviews, and is already available on Netflix (Season 5, Disc 1.)

Over on basic cable, Syfy’s Warehouse 13 had a creepy mystery involving Lewis Carroll’s mirror, which aired August 27. The trailer shows the protagonist finding the Looking-Glass in the warehouse, and accidentally unleashing an EVIL SPIRIT from the other side, namely the “murderous” ghost of Alice Liddell.

Syfy’s website had further description of the plot:

Evil dead Alice Liddell, in the Warehouse 13 episode “Fractures.”

[...] Almost immediately, a ping comes in that a young woman has transformed from her meek self to a salacious thug. By the time Pete and Myka realize that Alice Lidell escaped from Lewis Carroll’s mirror – and the mirror somehow got out of the Dark Vault – they realize that she’s also able to jump from body to body using a shard of the broken mirror. [...] Artie narrowly escapes the attack from a waitress, possessed by Alice, but once outside, he and Vanessa confer with Pete and Myka. Artie won’t explain how he knows, but says that Alice is there to kill him. They call back to the Warehouse and direct Jinks and Claudia to find a trapping artifact – a hookah that appeared in “Through the Looking-Glass” [sic]- so they can re-contain Alice.

Even if you missed the first-run on TV, this episode “Fractures” can be watched online in HD on Amazon Instant Video, for $2.99.

Tomorrow: Summer TV round-up PART TWO – Antiques Roadshow, Alice in Zombieland, and the future of Alice-derived Television

Snarkitecture aims to make architecture perform the unexpected

[Department of Portmanteaus] Today we give an honorable mention to the Brooklyn-based design studio Snarkitecture, recently featured in the Home & Garden section of the New York Times online. The studio, headed by Alex Mustonen and Daniel Arsham, creates sculptures and installations intended to unsettle: “Searching for sites within architecture with the possibility for confusion or misuse, Snarkitecture aims to make architecture perform the unexpected.” An exhibition of “funiture” — furniture that counts furnishing least among its aspirations, is currently on display at the Volume Gallery in Chicago.

Slip Bench by Snarkitecture

Slip Bench by Snarkitecture