Annual MIT Puzzle Hunt Has Alice in Wonderland Theme

Cat PuzzleAttention puzzle lovers!  We recently received this note that may be of interest to you:

“Hi,

I’m part of a team of puzzlers who spent most of last year writing LOTS of puzzles for the annual MIT Mystery Hunt (http://web.mit.edu/puzzle/www/history.html), which was this year Alice In Wonderland themed (with other Carrollian and non-Carrollian touches).
We had also noticed the call for puzzles here last June, but we were unable to participate as our writing process is very (almost comically) secretive, and the puzzles and theme were not to be revealed until the weekend of the recent Hunt.
A number of the puzzles we wrote require specific knowledge about MIT, and some aren’t strongly integrated into the theme, though they may still be of interest to you. The entire hunt, including all puzzles and solutions, can be found at the following address:  http://web.mit.edu/puzzle/www/2014
If you have any further questions about specific puzzles or would like to contact the author(s) directly, please feel free to email the team leadership at aliceshrugged@aliceshrugged.com . Enjoy!
Cheers,
Usman Akeju”

 

Remembering Martin Gardner

With great sadness we note the passing of Martin Gardner this past Saturday, May 22, 2010, in Norman, Oklahoma at the age of 95.  Martin Gardner was not only a founding member of the Lewis Carroll Society of North America but also, it is surely safe to say, the founder of serious Carroll studies through the publication of his book The Annotated Alice. That work, which went through three editions (The Annotated Alice, 1960; More Annotated Alice, 1990, and The Annotated Alice: The Definitive Edition, 2000) introduced countless numbers of people to Lewis Carroll’s Alice, thereby bringing Carroll’s works to the popular mind as never before.  His Annotated Alice also set the standard, one seldom equalled, for a numerous succession of annotated works by other authors.  In 1962 he published his Annotated Hunting of the Snark, reprinted in 2006 in an expanded, definitive edition with a brilliant introduction and appreciation by Adam Gopnik.

Like Lewis Carroll, Martin Gardner had a deep appreciation for serious and recreational mathematics [he wrote the famous “Mathematical Games” column in Scientific American for 25 years with more than a few touching on Carroll], a love of language and paradox, and a profound interest in religion.  Like Houdini, he was keen on magic tricks and equally intolerant of paranormalists and other charlatans.

Martin was always willing to help those who corresponded with him and, although some of us never had the privilege of meeting him, we all knew him and counted him both a learned guide and an always generous friend.