Sighting of a New Dutch Hunting of the Snark Edition

Ahoy, Snark lovers!  Our own Mahendra Singh, who published a stunning edition himself a few years ago, has alerted us to the publication of a new Dutch version of Lewis Carroll’s immortal The Hunting of the Snark.  If you can read Dutch, you can find out more by clicking here.

If, like me, you can’t understand much beyond:

‘Precies de plek voor een Snark!’ riep de Man met de Bel'

you’ll still probably enjoy a peek at the sample illustration on that page!

UPDATE: If you’d like to buy a copy, but can’t read the Dutch instructions, here they are in English:

Send an email (in English) to Dick Ronner at mail@zolderman.nl; he’ll send you back a PayPal invoice for 18.25 euros (about $24.50) including postage.

Walrus and Carpenter Scrimshaw Art

Here’s something you don’t see every day.  In fact, you’ve never seen one of these before–and may never see one again!  A new LCSNA member by the highly appropriate name of Ray Carpenter has created a one-of a kind scrimshaw artwork depicting the Walrus and the Carpenter–and also Lewis Carroll.  You can check out images of the artwork on his Etsy page.  It is not inexpensive, but presumably a collector of fine art will recognize the massive number of hours that have gone into the work’s creation.  We always love to see how Lewis Carroll’s works inspire artists around the world!

Why Children’s Books Matter at NY Public Library

The New York Public Library has a new exhibit entitled The ABC of it: Why Children’s Books Matter that explores both the importance and potency of children’s literature.  The exhibit draws from books over time and around the world, combining both well-known classics with lesser-known gems.  Lewis Carroll’s famous “Beggar Girl” photograph of Alice Liddell is one of the items on display, and is also part of the slideshow for this NY Times article about the exhibit.

If you attend the exhibit, add a Comment to this post and tell us what you thought!

“In Wonderland” Kickstarter Project

At our recent Winston-Salem meeting, we heard briefly from Ms. Amber Adams, a choreographer and dancer hoping to raise funds to finance a physical theatre program based on “Alice in Wonderland” in Wilmington, NC. As always, we make no comment or endorsement of anything we post per se; we just like to keep you informed!

You can read about it by clicking here.

A Jabberwocky for the Computer Programming Age

Today, we received this note and clever riff on Lewis Carroll’s famous poem Jabberwocky, from Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There.  Thank you, Austin Dixon, for sharing this with everyone!  Readers: if you enjoy it, please post a comment here to let Austin know you appreciate his efforts.  Thanks!  Now, we just need someone to write a version as a Monty Python script.

I would like to submit this Jabberwocky parody for your consideration. It’s what Jabberwocky would look like if it were a Python Script. I wrote this myself, and I give you the right to use it on your site if you wish. Just include my name if you do. Thanks.

 def jabberWocky (brillig, toves, slithey, gyre, gimble, borogroves, mimsey, in_grabe, out_grabe, mome):

while (brillig == True) AND (toves == slithy):

wabe = toves * (gyre + gimble)

return wabe

if (borogroves != mimsy):

mome.raths = in_grabe

momeStatus = mome.raths

print (“Status for Mome Raths is”, momeStatus)

else:

mome.raths = out_grabe

momeStatus = mome.raths

print (“Status for Mome Raths is”, momeStatus)

Copyright 2013 by
Austin Dixon
Digitization Technologist | Hoole Library

A New Theatrical Snark Sighting in Chicago

Apologies that we haven’t made a new post in a while. We have been off hunting Snarks–unsuccessfully, which may be just as well. Today, as Fate would have it, we received this very civilized note:

Dear Lewis Carroll Society 

My name is Josh Sobel and I am Literary Manager for Chicago’s Strawdog Theatre Company. I hope this email finds you well!  I noticed that you had posted information about the last time a Chicago theatre company had adapted Carroll for the stage, with the opera BOOJUM! 
 
As it turns out, the Snark has found its way to Chicago once again – I am directing an environmental, ensemble-based adaptation of the poem THE HUNTING OF THE SNARK with Strawdog, taking place in our Hugen Hall space (essentially our pub) and utilizing the actual text of the poem itself in inventive and unexpected ways. 
 
We have gathered 12 brilliant Chicago actors and have been working to bring the story to life in a minimalist, highly imaginative style, an almost pub-theatre approach engaging directly with the audience to open up their imaginations to the magic of this journey. 
 
Thank you very much for your time!  All the best, Josh Sobel

Their enclosed press release includes the following details:

Performances: May 6 – May 28 at Strawdog Theatre Hugen Hall, 3829 North Broadway Street. The performance schedule is Sundays, Mondays and Tuesdays at 8 p.m.; May 20 and 21 performances are at 9 p.m. Opening/Press Night is Monday, May 6 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15. Tickets may be ordered online at strawdog.org or by calling OvationTix toll-free: 866-811-4111.

Based on the classic Lewis Carroll poem, The Hunting Of The Snark,  is a family friendly show inviting its guests to come aboard for a tall tale of mischief and mayhem, of high sea hijinks and impossible voyages, of an improbable crew and an extraordinary task, of an inconceivable creature in a peculiar land, and of the unquenchable thirst for adventure.  A design and ensemble-based piece mixing theatrical influences from Chicago and around theworld; Strawdog stretches, flexes, trips over a ladder and treats the audience to a hilarious and touching take on one of the world’s best loved poems.

If you attend this production, please email us a 1-2 paragraph write-up that we can share on this blog!

And here’s a video teaser they’ve just released:

New Alice-Themed Web Comic Namesake Launches

Isabelle Melançon, creator of the new web comic Namesake, which has just launched, promises that Lewis Carroll, Alice, and many familiar fairy tale characters figure prominently in the story.  From the web site:

“Namesake is the story of Emma Crewe, a woman who discovers she can visit other worlds. She finds out that these are places she already knows – fantasy and fairy lands made famous through the spoken word, literature and cinema. Her power as a Namesake forces her to act as a protagonist in these familiar stories as she figures out how to get home.  But as she travels, she discovers that those controlling her story have their own selfish goals in mind – and her fate is the key to everyone’s happy ending.  Join Emma, her sister Elaine and their friends as they tumble down the rabbit hole.  If you like, adventure, humor, stories of friendship, fairy tales and fantasy, this is the webcomic for you.”

Click the image on this post to visit the site.  Since the comic will have new content three times a week, if you like what you see, you might want to subscribe to the site’s RSS feed to make sure you see the prologue and all subsequent pages.