Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland “Mad Hatter’s Mashup Party”

mad hatter mashupSomething really cool is happening this month in honor of Alice 150 – a giant social, open source, public domain, digital publishing event all centered around Alice.  Sponsored by and hosted on Medium, a social writing platform created by Twitter co-founder Ev Williams.

This event invites anyone to publish their own digital version of Alice using public domain art or their own.  A dozen noted Carrollians – including our fearless leader Stephanie Lovett – will each annotate a chapter of Alice.  In addition, artists are also being commissioned to create new illustrations – more to follow.  For details on this and how to be a part of it, check out the event page and join the fun!  Medium have done some of the legwork already:

To help people get started, we are hosting the original text, formatted for Medium, which participants are free to copy and use to build their own digital editions. We have also gathered many public domain art works inspired by Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, including the original illustrations accompanying the first edition by Sir John Tenniel, illustrations from Arthur Rackham, two silent black and white movie adaptations and other inspirations, which participants are free to use in addition to their own art.

Wall Street Journal Article on Alice 150 and Translations

Everyone is definitely jumping on the bandwagon for Alice’s 150th, including the Wall Street Journal.  Today’s issue features an article featuring discussion on all the various translations – including the upcoming work by Carrollian Jon Lindseth.  Check it out!

Interesting Article on the Bangalore Alice

Ever wondered about that copy of the 1865 Alice that turned up in an Indian bazaar?  This article has some interesting points, and sets a few things straight.  I’ll leave it up to the hard-core Carrollians to validate or vilify.

Rackham iPad App

There is a new Alice iPad app, featuring beautifully rendered Arthur Rackham illustrations!  At $2.99 it is a bargain.  Get yours now!  From the iTunes page:

• Complete set of Interactive illustrated boards beautifully adapted for iPad and iPad Mini with animations, physical objects, and interactive sounds.
• Complete set of original boards presented in the Historical Notes section.
• Amazing environmental soundtracks inside the Interactive Boards.
• Help Guide to the Interactive Boards for the youngest readers.
• “Invisible ink objects” to play with on every text page, just touch the letters!
• Camera function to mix your portraits inside these wonderful compositions and save on your iPad or share with family and friends.
• Detailed navigation menus.
• Full texts in the original version and from the earliest translations: English (1856), French (1869), Italian (1871) and Spanish (1922).
• In addition, find rich and interesting historical notes about Arthur Rackham, his work, the world he worked in, and the context of Carroll’s fantastic book (English only).
• Retina Ready

-App designed for iPad™ (2nd, 3rd, 4th generation) iPad air™ and iPad mini™ all generations-

Review of new Alice/Carroll Book “The Story of Alice”

The book The Story of Alice:  Lewis Carroll and the Secret History of Wonderland has just been published in the UK, and will be available here in the US on June 1st – how typical :-)  For those in the UK you can purchase it here now.

On March 22, the Guardian published an lengthy review of the book, posed several questions and posited several theories of its own.  I shall leave it to the reader to weigh the merits of any such comments in either the review or the book reviewed.  Needless to say, the reviewer calls it the best book on the subject.

 

Lewis Carroll’s Dream-child and Victorian Child Psychopathology

A new paper has been published by Stephanie L. Schatz, a research fellow at Purdue, and she has graciously provided us with a link to the paper.  Abstract below:

This essay reads Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1865) alongside influential mid-century Victorian psychology studies—paying special attention to those that Carroll owned—in order to trace the divergence of Carroll’s literary representations of the “dream child” from its prevailing medical association with mental illness. The goals of this study are threefold: to trace the medico-historical links between dream-states and childhood, to investigate the medical reasons behind the pathologization of dream-states, and to understand how Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland contributed to Victorian interpretations of the child’s mind.

New Picture Book Retelling of Alice

AliceInWonderlandIn celebration of the 150th anniversary, Imagine! Publishing (an imprint of Charlesbridge) is publishing a picture book edition called Alice in Wonderland: Down the Rabbit Hole. Fashioned as an introduction to the classic for younger readers, the story is retold by Charles Nurnberg and Joe Rhatigan with luminous paintings by bestselling French illustrator Eric Puybaret.

 

New Illustrated Alice in the Netherlands

A newly illustrated hardcover Wonderland / Looking-Glass has been released in the Netherlands by artist Floor Rieder, translated by Sofia Englishman.  The illustrations are quite charming and I think will be of interest to many in our humble little society. You can order it (€25) here, or through various Netherlands bookstores through its ISBN, 9789025759179.

A Perfect Likeness – You Too Can Perform It

Those of you who attended the 2013 Spring meeting in Winston-Salem, NC will remember the wonderful play written fellow society member Daniel Singer that we all enjoyed as a part of the festivities.  It has recently come to our attention that you may now purchase a copy of the official script, and license it for performance!  I’m sure Daniel would love to see many performances of his play all over the world, and we would too!

Alice150 Kicking Off the Year with a Big Article in the NYT

So great news for Carrollians, the larger world is starting to notice that this year is the 150th anniversary of AAIW.  And what better way to start than with a nice article in the New York Times.