Abandoned Alice in Wonderland Theme Park in Korea?!

I have never heard of this, but looks like it must’ve been quite bizarre.  Blogger Lindsay Eryn stumbled upon the abandoned park and shared some photos.  Sadly the park has since been completely demolished.

Huffington Post Article on Spring Meeting and Alice150

LCSNA member Cathy Rubin has published an article on the Huffington Post all about Alice – Alice150 that is. Spread the word, Alice150 is only 15 months away!

Please Welcome Our New BlogMasters!

RabbitLogoSmRI’m delighted to announce that Matt Crandall and Wendy Lane Crandall have graciously (and jointly) agreed to take over the job of blogmaster for the LCSNA effective immediately so that I can focus on my growing workload.

It’s been a pleasure being blogmaster for you all, and I hope you will remember to keep sending Mat and Wendy new items regularly via: blogmaster@lewiscarroll.org. Thanks, Matt and Wendy, and thank you all.  — Andrew

More on Madness and Uncle Skeffington Lutwidge

Addendum: Inconvenient People author Sarah Wise (see prior post) has kindly shared with us the dates of two more blog posts from her web site that reference Uncle Skeffington Lutwidge: May 19, 2013 and June 27, 2013.

To visit Ms. Wise’s site, click me.

Calling all Mimsy Minions! Blog Posts Needed!

Mr. Dodgson dreaming up a new blog post….

Attention, all Mimsy Minions! (If Lady Gaga can dub her fans “Little Monsters” then surely Lewis Carroll’s must be called “Mimsy Minions”.)  It’s a lot of work to keep up with nifty Carrollian information for our blog.  Please pitch in and show your colors!  Submit any blog-worthy items (with URLs where appropriate) to me at: blogmaster@lewiscarroll.org.  Do this early and often!  Let’s demonstrate just how nifty blog crowdsourcing can be.  Thanks!  :-)

Carroll Publishes Wonderland One Day at a Time

Perhaps unique in the annals of Alice publishing, syndicated columnist Jon Carroll of the San Francisco Chronicle is publishing the text of Wonderland one sentence at a time at the end of his column, beginning on July 25 in one titled “Turning on to rainbows, and tuning out.” He had just finished publishing King Lear this same way. Inspiration perhaps came from a similar stunt in the New Yorker, whose editor, Gardner Botsford, got bored with seeing the same capsule review for The Fantastics, which ran for 42 years. In its place, beginning on November 23, 1968, with the copyright—or, one could argue, December 21 with the opening line—it began serializing the first chapter of Ulysses, ending in November of 1971.

Alice ducks?

Thanks to the excellent facebook page Alice In Wonderland Inspired Photography, Movies and Art (we recommend “liking” it, if you enjoy the occasional Alice image in your news feed) for posting these images from the Tumblr blog Everything Is Better With Ducks, devoted entirely to re-imaging things with ducks. The mission statement: “Ducks are great and I LOVE them! They make things more awesome.”

Caterina Morelli’s Italian index of illustrated Alices

wonderlandbooks.blogspot.com

For many collectors, the act of cataloging the collection can be an essential part of the pleasure. Caterina Morelli’s blog Alice in Wonderland is a great example. In her native Italian, Morelli painstakingly documents her extensive collection of Carroll editions; as she puts it, “every post is an index card of a book.” Each card starts with an evocative description of the edition, followed by detailed information about the illustrator, publisher, and text – even the dimensions and the construction of the book are recorded. The cards are organized by illustrator.

When she told me about her blog, Caterina mentioned that some day she would like to translate it into English. Perhaps someone reading this blog is an Italian-English translator and an Alice fan? Would you like to help with her project? What nicer way could there be to brush up on your Italian?

 

Management Strategies from the Mad Hatter

they were trying to put the Dormouse into the teapotWould you take lessons in business management from the Mad Hatter? Charles Jennings, British “thought leader” and learning and performance consultant thinks that might not be such a bad idea.

In a January blog post Managers and Mad Hatters: Work that Stretches, Jennings takes events from tea party and turns them into lessons in leadership for today’s managers.

“Alice looked back once or twice, half hoping they would call after her: the last time she saw them they were trying to put the Dormouse into the teapot”

Many [learning and development] people struggle with the challenge of engaging and enrolling business managers in employee development. Trying to wedge them into a place they don’t really want to be. More…

The post is the last in a series of three which uses Alice’s adventures to illuminate strategies for effective learning in the workplace wonderland. Previous posts covered “The Lobster Quadrille for Learning and Development” and topical advice from the Cheshire Cat.

 

 

“Ink Me” – Alice in Wonderland among the most popular literary tattoos

The Publisher’s Weekly blog PWxyz ranked The 5 Books that Inspire the Most Tattoos, finding Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in the top 5. Their online research seems to be thorough, even if the methods aren’t scientific: “We spent an untold number of hours combing the Internet’s two most extensive literary tattoo sites: Contrariwise: Literary Tattoos and The Word Made Flesh, then cross-checking the most frequently occurring tattoos with Google searches and Google image searches, all to get to the bottom of what books inspire the most tattoos and why.” Lewis Carroll’s book was beat out only by… Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut, only because of the popularity of the phrase “So it goes.” So it goes.

2. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Evidence:  hip “Who in the world am I”twinkle twinkle feet,shoulder caterpillarhip “take care”ankle cheshireback nonsense,leg dodoforearm “we’re all mad here”shoulder cheshirefeet rabbit and hatter.

Alice has inspired the most varied collection of tattoos of any book. Its wide cast of characters, quotes and images are all represented: the Cheshire Cat, the Dodo, the White Rabbit, and the Caterpillar all have fans out there. Out of the quotes, “We’re all mad here” was the most commonly occurring. Credit Alice‘s popularity among the tattooed to the fully-realized world Carroll created, and for tone specific to its story. More than any other book on this list, you’d be likely to get an Alice tattoo because it simply looks great and is hyper-intricate. Tim, who has an image of the Cheshire Cat on his shoulder blade, said on Contrariwise: “The Cheshire Cat is the only creature in Wonderland who uses logic. Though his words often seem mocking and bizarre, his process is always logical. To me the Cheshire Cat symbolizes the fragility of the border between genius and insanity.”