LCSNA Fall Meeting Announced and Two Book Sales Here and Now

NYU flagSeptember may be a whole summer away, but plans for LCSNA Fall 2012 Meeting are already coming together. Confirmed speakers include Adam Gopnik on Sylvie and Bruno and Robin Wilson, who wrote Lewis Carroll in Numberland. The meeting will take place on Saturday, September 29 at the Fales Library in New York University (home of the fabled Berol collection).

In the meantime be sure to check out two Lewis Carroll book sales currently underway. Thanks to the generosity of some of our members both will benefit the Lewis Carroll Society of North America.

First, we have a selection of Carrollian books donated by former member Lynn Steveson.

Secondly, several items (mostly, but not only books) donated by member Barbara Mall. These items were first offered for sale a couple of years ago and those that did not sell are now available at a savings of (for most items) 50%. The prices listed are the new prices.

Please enjoy looking. To purchase, contact secretary@lewiscarroll.org.

 

 

 

 

Pick up where Tenniel left off with this poster and coloring book

Alice in Wonderland: Giant Poster Coloring Book (2012)

What color do you think Alice’s dress should be?

This coloring book contains two copies of each of twelve Tenniel illustrations – one in the original black and white to color as you please, and one pre-colored to frame and enjoy. The 12 by 15 inch posters are detachable and the book also contains the full text of the story.

The book was first published in 2010, but appears to have been re-released with a different cover on March 1 this year. Reviews of the original book on Barnes and Noble are very positive. The newer version is selling for around $9 on Amazon.

Detail from the original 2010 edition

500 years of interactive books (and no iPads) at the University of Rochester

Another exhibition for our East Coast readers: Springing to Life: Movable Books & Mechanical Devices at the University of Rochester.

Interactive books long-predate the LCD screen, and this exhibition features over 50 examples of pop-up, pull-tab, lift-flap, spin-dial papier-mechanical ingenuity from the past 500 years. In the video below, curator Leah Hamilton introduces the exhibition and demonstrates some of the items on display. Robert Sabuda’s Alice pop-up features prominently as does work by Kubasta, who created the wonderful pop-up Alice published in 1960.

The exhibition is being held University of Rochester, Rare Books and Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library from January 23 to August 17, 2012. Call (585) 275-4477 for exhibition hours.

Caterina Morelli’s Italian index of illustrated Alices

wonderlandbooks.blogspot.com

For many collectors, the act of cataloging the collection can be an essential part of the pleasure. Caterina Morelli’s blog Alice in Wonderland is a great example. In her native Italian, Morelli painstakingly documents her extensive collection of Carroll editions; as she puts it, “every post is an index card of a book.” Each card starts with an evocative description of the edition, followed by detailed information about the illustrator, publisher, and text – even the dimensions and the construction of the book are recorded. The cards are organized by illustrator.

When she told me about her blog, Caterina mentioned that some day she would like to translate it into English. Perhaps someone reading this blog is an Italian-English translator and an Alice fan? Would you like to help with her project? What nicer way could there be to brush up on your Italian?

 

New book about Tony Sarg and a video of his “mechanical book”

There is a new children’s book about Tony Sarg, master puppeteer and inventor of the first balloons for New York’s Macy Day Parade. Sarg was also the creator of Tony Sarg’s Treasure Book – an early “mechanical book” with sliding illustrations and removable pieces. The Alice in Wonderland chapter, demonstrated in the video below, is clearly an important ancestor of last year’s interactive e-book for iPad.

Balloons over Broadway: The True Story of the Puppeteer of Macy’s Parade, written and illustrated by Melissa Sweet, is published by Houghton Mifflin Books for Children and priced at $11.55.

Melissa Sweet "Balloons Over Broadway"

 

“Eat me” necklace not at all provocative

Necklace in Wonderland from ModCloth.com

Necklace in Wonderland from ModCloth.com

A tiny bottle of treats labeled “eat me” to wear around your neck? What could be sweeter? The necklace is made by a Scottish designer “And Mary,” and is for sale on ModCloth.com for $24.99.

Note: it is not at all clear from the description whether or not the treats are edible.

Half off Tenniel breakfast accoutrements at Fishs Eddy

Fishs Eddy Alice Glass

Fishs Eddy ($2.50)

It looks like Fishs Eddy might be liquidating their line of Alice in Wonderland dinnerware.  Cereal bowls, drinking glasses, and plates are now 50% off and many of the items listed last time we checked have disappeared with nary a smile or a wink. If you have ever wanted that Tenniel highball/juice glass set, you better get it now!

Interior Design by Wonderland

When not the day of rest, Sunday is the day of home improvements so here’s a link to She Magazine’s guide to Alice in Wonderland-inspired home décor. Contributing editor Michele Borboa’s round-up of Wonderland furnishings includes a few I haven’t seen before, including a teacup chandelier by TransGlobe ($196) and a Cheshire Cat tapestry wall hanging ($109). DIY? More like, DIY not?

She Knows Magazine "Fantasy Furniture"

 

Pull up a tea cup stool


Is it beautiful? Maybe. Does it add sophistication and charm to your home? Probably not. Do we like it anyway? Yes! Tea party on!

The tea cup stool is sold by UK retailer Mocha for around $255 and is available in four colors.

The Daguerreotype that was not Dodgson or The High Price of Mistaken Identity

Who are you?

Dr Michael Pritchard, a regular contributor to the British Photographic History Blog, has alerted us to his cautionary tale about the uncertain world of eBay bidding. The above daguerreotype, which if you can’t read it is captioned “Charles L. Dodgson Christ Church 1858,” recently sold on eBay for £3,300, about $5,300. The image, if you can’t see it either, is clearly not of Dodgson, in fact the sitter looks more like a cross between Benjamin Disraeli and the Mock Turtle. The suspicious back story to the sale and the insights of the photographic experts all make interesting reading here.