Alice and Believing in Medieval Unicorns

An Alice sighting in Unicorn-land from LCSNA member Stephanie Lovett:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Cloisters Museum, home of the famous unicorn tapestries, has an exhibit running called Search for the Unicorn, which opens with the “If you believe in me, I’ll believe in you” quote from Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There.  The NY Times review cites it and links to the full text, and also provides a slideshow of the exhibit.

Not a Bit!

Image copyright by Kris Temmerman

A high-resolution bitmap artwork containing the entire text of Wonderland in the shape of Alice herself can be found here. The text is broken down into words whose frequency determines their size in the finished image. Add a bit of artistic creativity, and voila!  Mad hats off to creative developer Kris Temmerman, who created this image.

Illustrating Alice

Alice, Copyright by Alain Gauthier

This just in from LCSNA President Mark Burstein:

A gorgeous fine press book from Artists’ Choice Editions in London makes good on its promise of “an international survey of illustrated editions,” with over 400 pictures from the works. Unlike other books on the subject that tend to only print pictures in public domain, this one is truly inclusive, and global. There are articles both historically by region and by some of the illustrators themselves (Barry Moser, Ralph Steadman, Helen Oxenbury, Jan Svankmajer, and the like). Checklists abound. In both Standard and Special editions, the latter carrying four signed giclée prints. You can order books or ask for a prospectus here.

Camille Rose Garcia and Mary Blair Exhibit at Disney Family Museum

Camille Rose Garcia’s Duchess ©2010

Attention lovers of Carroll/Alice-themed art!  We have just learned of the following exhibit, opening May 9th.  If you attend, drop us a line and let us know what you thought!

Camille Rose Garcia: Down the Rabbit Hole
Walt Disney Family Museum
San Francisco, California
May 9–November 3, 2013

This exhibition will feature two very different artists who have contributed to the canon of Alice illustration: Mary Blair and Camille Rose Garcia. Color stylist and designer Mary Blair helped introduce modern art to Walt Disney and his studio, and worked with him for nearly 30 years. Ten of her concept paintings for the 1951 Alice in Wonderland animated film will be on display. Juxtapozed (the spelling is intentional to reflect the sponsor of the exhibit) with this are 40 drawings by Camille Rose Garcia from her illustrated Wonderland in 2010. “With her conscious disregard for perspective or scale in her compositions, Garcia creates a fresh and contemporary depiction of the dreamlike story. Her illustrations not only draw from a Goth sensibility, but also the thriving ‘low-brow art’ movement in Los Angeles and its references to classic cartoons, 60’s TV sitcoms, rock music, and comic books.” Further information at http://www.waltdisney.org/garcia.

Dance with Alice in Berlin

Ruth Sergel

Ruth Sergel

Imagine the scene in the gallery: on a giant screen, you watch Alice leap off a book and lead you into Wonderland. Slowly you realize that the animation you are watching is somehow watching you—and copying your every move. As the artist, Ruth Sergel, describes it: “In front of the looking glass,  fantasy and reality merge as Alice fluidly mirrors the viewer’s every move.” The interactive work is currently being exhibited at Multimedier Schlachthof in Berlin, Germany.

Ruth Sergel is an American artist, activist, and “interactive technology designer” whose film and performance work has appeared at MOMA in New York, and in galleries around Europe. More information about “Alice in Berlin” can be found on Sergel’s website, Street Pictures, where there is also a video showing visitors interacting with Alice.

No cuentes lo que viste en los jardines…

“EL CORAZÓN DE ALICIA” by Ricardo Selma

Ricardo Selma, an Argentinian artist of great technical skill, has many beautiful works (most featuring a beautiful woman in some state of repose) with nods to Klimpt, Mucha, The Wizard of Oz, and Alice in Wonderland. Some of the latter, including the pieces “El corazón de Alicia” and “No cuentes lo que viste en los jardines…,” can be seen at his blog ricardocelma.blogspot.com.

“ALICE IN TOKIO” by Ricardo Selma

Also found on his blog was this passionate ALL-CAPS artist’s statement (I’ve included a sloppy Google translation below.)

CUANTAS VECES LEÍ Y ESCUCHÉ, QUE EL ARTE HABÍA MUERTO, QUE LA PINTURA DE CABALLETE YA NO TENIA SENTIDO, CUANTAS VECES A LOS ARTISTAS QUE TRATAMOS DE SEGUIR UN OFICIO Y REVERENCIAMOS LAS TÉCNICAS DE NUESTROS MAESTROS NOS RECHAZAN DE TODO EVENTO ARTÍSTICO NOVEDOSO O VANGUARDISTA, PERO ¿HAY ALGO MAS NOVEDOSO PARA ESTOS TIEMPOS QUE VIVIMOS QUE ESTE TIPO DE PINTURA? EN UNA ÉPOCA DONDE TODO ES VORÁGINE Y VÉRTIGO, EL ARTE TE OBLIGA A CONTEMPLAR; EN UN TIEMPO DONDE TODO SE ACELERA, EL ARTE TE LLEVA A RESPIRAR PROFUNDO Y TENER OBJETIVOS PENSADOS CON TIEMPO; AHORA QUE TODO ES VIRTUAL INGRÁVIDO INMATERIAL, EL ARTE TE HACE SENTIR LAS TEXTURAS, AHORA QUE LA TECNOLOGÍA AVANZA APLASTANDO TODO LO ANTERIOR, PARA HACER ESTE ARTE NECESITAS SOLO DE UN PEDAZO DE CARBÓN COMO HACE 12000 AÑOS.
QUIZÁS ES CIERTO Y TENGAN RAZÓN LOS CRÍTICOS Y PUEDE QUE LOS PINTORES SOLO SEAMOS SOMBRAS DE UN ARTE YA MUERTO, PERO MIENTRAS SIENTA ESA NECESIDAD DE AGARRAR UN PINCEL Y OLVIDARME DEL MUNDO, SUS PROBLEMAS Y SUS MIEDOS Y SOLAMENTE HUNDIRME EN PENSAMIENTOS QUE SE TRANSFORMAN EN COLORES E IMÁGENES, VOY A SEGUIR DISFRUTANDO , PINTANDO TANTO, ANTES DEL FIN…

Google Translation:

MANY TIMES read and heard, that art was dead, that easel painting no longer made sense, how often to artists who try to follow a trade and revere our teachers TECHNIQUES WE DISCLAIM ALL NOVEL or avant-garde artistic event, But is there anything more novel for these times we live in that this type of paint? In an age where EVERYTHING IS maelstrom and vertigo, ART forces you to contemplate, in a time where everything is accelerating, ART TAKES YOU AND HAVE A DEEP BREATH OBJECTIVES DESIGNED WITH TIME, now that everything is weightless VIRTUAL HERITAGE, THE ART TE DO feel textures, now that technology treaded FOREGOING, THIS ART TO NEED JUST A PIECE OF COAL AS 12,000 years ago.
PERHAPS HAVE REASON IS TRUE AND CRITICS AND MAY ONLY WE ARTISTS ART AND SHADOWS OF A DEAD, BUT THAT WHILE SITTING need to grab a brush and forget the world, their problems and their fears and sink ONLY IN THOUGHTS become colors and images, I’ll keep enjoying, PAINTING BOTH BEFORE END

“NO CUENTES LO QUE VISTE EN LOS JARDINES…” by Ricardo Selma

Alice at a Glance: One-Page Wonderlands

Looking for all of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland on a single page? Yes, it has been done, and what’s more, you have quite a selection to choose from.

Novel Poster sell this 18 by 26 inch, very-legible print that reveals Alice playing croquet in the negative space ($40).

Novel Poster

Postertext make one similar, but with slightly different dimensions—a 20 by 24 inch print with the text split over seven columns reveals Alice talking to the Cheshire Cat ($23.99).

20 x 24″ from Postertext

This action shot from Spineless Classics shows their more detailed poster. It measures 50 by 70 centimeters (about 20 by 28 inches) ($39.99).

Spineless Classics

Litographs offer several options: the 24 x 36 inch print ($29) includes the full text of both Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass ($29); the 18 x 24 inch print includes the full text of just Wonderland ($24).

Litographs

The Litographs prints are the only ones available in color ($29 for the smaller poster, $39 for the larger one). They also make a full-text t-shirtguaranteed to get you some squinty attention whenever you wear it.

Litographs

For a greater challenge, you might like to try assembling you own one-page Wonderland with this 672-piece jigsaw puzzle from Spineless Classics ($29.99). In addition to whiling away a winter evening, I’m sure it’s also a fascinating way to get to know the book really well.

Spineless Classics

Renaissance Art and Technology Combine to Tell Alice’s Story Again

Emmanuel Paletz

Are tablet computers revolutionizing the picture book? Ask me again in a hundred years. In the meantime, authors continue to explore the question by experimenting with the ever-willing, always-revolutionary Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. First to be mentioned on this site was Atomic Antelope’s ground-breaking “digital pop-up book”, then David Neal’s animation of classic illustrations. Now we have a third: an unabridged Alice illustrated with images from Renaissance art. The result sounds like it will be interesting:

To portray the colorful events and idiosyncratic characters of this book, Paletz gleans bits and pieces from Jan van Eyck, Joachim Patinir, Quentin Matsys, Hans Holbein, Sandro Botticelli, Pieter Brueghel the Elder, Hieronymus Bosch and more, combining them into his signature visual collages which dazzle the eye. Alice is a book filled with riddles, puzzles, illogical delightfulness, and brainteasers.

… Most importantly, Paletz’s layered creation will inspire thought. Readers will fall into musings such as, “What is the historical significance of dressing Fish-Footmen in French Revolution military uniforms and the king as Henry VIII?” The use of Dutch and Flemish Renaissance art extends farther than the eye can see. Paletz pulls from historical events to shape each illustration with significance.

The book is the brainchild of Emmanuel Paletz, a creative consultant for the advertising industry and also the art director for the successful cookbook Art and Cook. Read more about him and about the storybook app on the project’s website. Emmanuel is seeking financial assistance to help bring his ebook project to completion. Donations of any amount can be made on the fundraising site IndieGoGo.

Alice in Wonderland Mural Discovered at San Diego State University

A lost mural of Alice in Wonderland and the archaeologist determined to bring it to light were the subjects of an interesting tale told by San Diego public radio station, KPBS, yesterday.

Seth Mallios, head of the anthropology department at SDSU, had been hunting down murals, once common all over campus, when he heard about the Alice mural from Evelyn Kooperman, a retired librarian.

When she was a little girl in the 1950s, her mother used to take her to see two murals tucked away in Hardy Tower. One featured the character of Odysseus. The other, was the “Alice in Wonderland” mural. “I just thought they were wonderful,” says Kooperman. “They were big and bright and colorful. And I just loved them and every year I would say to my mother, ‘I want to go see Alice! I want to go see Alice!’”

Read about Mallios’s discovery of the mural, and of the artist who painted it, on the KPBS website. You can also see an old photograph of the mural and listen to the original radio broadcast.

A Random Collection of Videos Relating to Alice

It’s a wonderland out there on the internet. Just look what we discovered this week…

Life in Five Minutes – Alice in Wonderland posted by dabitch on adland.tv with the caption “This is all I ever took away from that book.” (“What a pity!”)

Yasutaka Funakoshi’s Alice-inspired catwalk collection presented at Tokyo Fashion Week last October.

Lewis Carroll Underworld, a pretty song composed and performed by Boston-based musician Craig Robertson.

That’s all for now. If you have any video finds of your own, remember to share them on our Facebook page.