Alice-Themed Pinhole Photography Exhibition at Oxford Botanic Garden

We recently received the following note from Mabel Odessey, an American artist living in France:

“Hello,

I am contacting you about my current exhibition/installation at the University of Oxford Botanic Garden. the exhibition opened on Alice Day July 6 and will run till the end of August so there is still time to catch it!

The subject of these pinhole photographs are marionnettes made by the English artist Margaret Littleton Cook (1940s). They explore the characters as representations of psycological states and Alice’s dream of wonderland as a spiritual journey. To come upon images in the garden unexpectedly much like Alice was confronted by characters in the books will give her psychological journey a geographic sense.

Each character Alice encounters on her journey represents a disturbing emotion that must be  transformed in order to reach enlightenment. Carroll calls the Queen of Hearts the embodiment of anger. Lewis Carroll the logician brings up many philosophical debates in the books. He uses nonsense to explore concepts such as time, perception,  impermanence,  duality, identity and the role of language. Using marionettes as subjects echoes this playful approach.

Using the historic process of pinhole photography give the images a particular resonance and there is no denying the connection between the  upside down back to front world behind the looking glass and the positive and negative in photography.  Not to mention Carroll’s interest in perception and photography.

The installation considers the qualities of different spaces in the garden and uses the shady places for the darker more mysterious photographs, and more open spaces to echo the images of understanding and clarity. Visitors will have a unique experience of the images as the light and the garden change throughout the day and season.

Kind Regards,
Mabel”

So, if you’re in the Oxford vicinity and enjoy gardens, marionettes, and/or Alice-themed art, you have until the end of August to view this al fresco exhibit.

Facebook Pages Dedicated to Alice and Illustrations

If you are a Facebook user, you probably already know that there are a number of Facebook pages that pay tribute to Alice illustrations, or have other Carrollian connections.  Here are just a handful, in case you’ve missed any of them.  TIP: You can find these and others under our “Likes” section on our Facebook page.  If you know of more, please send us the link!

Wonderland Books

Alice in Wonderland Inspired Photography, Movies and Art 

Alice’s Bloody Adventures in Wonderland

 

 

 

 

Walrus and Carpenter Scrimshaw Art

Here’s something you don’t see every day.  In fact, you’ve never seen one of these before–and may never see one again!  A new LCSNA member by the highly appropriate name of Ray Carpenter has created a one-of a kind scrimshaw artwork depicting the Walrus and the Carpenter–and also Lewis Carroll.  You can check out images of the artwork on his Etsy page.  It is not inexpensive, but presumably a collector of fine art will recognize the massive number of hours that have gone into the work’s creation.  We always love to see how Lewis Carroll’s works inspire artists around the world!

A Paper Doll To Call Your Own: Alice

Artist Sue Shanahan has added a new Alice-themed post to her child-centric blog, commonplacegrace.com.  In it, Sue ponders what might have led Lewis Carroll to pen the Alice books, and also shares an image of a charming Alice paper doll that she created a few years ago as a gift for the attendees at a United Federation of Doll Clubs convention.  She also includes a photo of the her niece, who modeled for the image.

You can read the post on Sue’s site, or find it in the Huffington Post’s Arts and Culture section.

Sue is also selling signed prints of the paper doll image for a modest price on her Etsy site.  And if there’s a paper doll art collector among you, the original one-of-a-kind artwork is currently still available for sale directly from Ms. Shanahan for US $22.00.

Cool Alice Art Car for Sale

Looking for a new set of wheels?  Or a nifty one-of-a-kind piece of Alice art sculpture?  Or maybe both?  Have a look at these images of artist Valerie Young’s new work.  You can click each image to see a larger version. This information was sent along with the pictures:

“Artist Valerie Young writes, “When I first saw the pair of plaster feet sitting on a box at our local flea market I knew immediately that I had found Alice. But what to do with “her” next?  I had just finished reading Harrod Blank’s “Wild Cars” so I thought to myself maybe Alice would like a car. As you can see, I still think of Alice as a delightful childhood friend. An old rusted pedal  car was next followed by two plastic pink flamingos and the Alice car was off and running–so to speak.  Gathering or creating all the iconic items was great fun and soon it became, officially, “Alice, You Can Drive My Car” (apologies to the Beatles).

Valerie Young is a found-object sculptor whose work was recently part of the “Alice: Into the Looking Glass” exhibit at the Noyes Museum in Oceanville, NJ. Her work has also been shown at the Gallery at Chapin in Lawrence, NJ; the Frank J. Miele Gallery in New York; the Outsider Art Fair in New York; the Bernstein Gallery of the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University, and Riverrun Gallery in Lambertville, NJ. She was also included in the shows: “Vision and Voice: Folk Art by Woman of the 20th Century” at the Chubb Atrium Gallery, and “Seven New Jersey Sculptors” at the Art Gallery of The College of New Jersey.

To learn more, you can contact Valerie at mvyoung@mac.com

“Email is the best way to contact me but phone is fine too: 609.466.2394.””

 

3D Paper Layer Alice Art Image

Korean artist Cheong-ah Hwang has created this stunning Alice image using a technique of layering paper to create a 3D effect.  To see other (non-Carollian) images she has created, click here.  Wouldn’t it be great to see a whole edition of the Alice books illustrated by this talented, self-taught artist?

Here she shares photos of creating it!

You can also buy a giclee print of this image in two sizes on Etsy.

Lovely work!

Alice and Believing in Medieval Unicorns

An Alice sighting in Unicorn-land from LCSNA member Stephanie Lovett:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Cloisters Museum, home of the famous unicorn tapestries, has an exhibit running called Search for the Unicorn, which opens with the “If you believe in me, I’ll believe in you” quote from Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There.  The NY Times review cites it and links to the full text, and also provides a slideshow of the exhibit.

Not a Bit!

Image copyright by Kris Temmerman

A high-resolution bitmap artwork containing the entire text of Wonderland in the shape of Alice herself can be found here. The text is broken down into words whose frequency determines their size in the finished image. Add a bit of artistic creativity, and voila!  Mad hats off to creative developer Kris Temmerman, who created this image.

Illustrating Alice

Alice, Copyright by Alain Gauthier

This just in from LCSNA President Mark Burstein:

A gorgeous fine press book from Artists’ Choice Editions in London makes good on its promise of “an international survey of illustrated editions,” with over 400 pictures from the works. Unlike other books on the subject that tend to only print pictures in public domain, this one is truly inclusive, and global. There are articles both historically by region and by some of the illustrators themselves (Barry Moser, Ralph Steadman, Helen Oxenbury, Jan Svankmajer, and the like). Checklists abound. In both Standard and Special editions, the latter carrying four signed giclée prints. You can order books or ask for a prospectus here.

Camille Rose Garcia and Mary Blair Exhibit at Disney Family Museum

Camille Rose Garcia’s Duchess ©2010

Attention lovers of Carroll/Alice-themed art!  We have just learned of the following exhibit, opening May 9th.  If you attend, drop us a line and let us know what you thought!

Camille Rose Garcia: Down the Rabbit Hole
Walt Disney Family Museum
San Francisco, California
May 9–November 3, 2013

This exhibition will feature two very different artists who have contributed to the canon of Alice illustration: Mary Blair and Camille Rose Garcia. Color stylist and designer Mary Blair helped introduce modern art to Walt Disney and his studio, and worked with him for nearly 30 years. Ten of her concept paintings for the 1951 Alice in Wonderland animated film will be on display. Juxtapozed (the spelling is intentional to reflect the sponsor of the exhibit) with this are 40 drawings by Camille Rose Garcia from her illustrated Wonderland in 2010. “With her conscious disregard for perspective or scale in her compositions, Garcia creates a fresh and contemporary depiction of the dreamlike story. Her illustrations not only draw from a Goth sensibility, but also the thriving ‘low-brow art’ movement in Los Angeles and its references to classic cartoons, 60’s TV sitcoms, rock music, and comic books.” Further information at http://www.waltdisney.org/garcia.